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Old 07-01-2011, 12:23 AM   #1
King Kashue
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The "Ideas Worth Sharing" Thread

We've got the picture thread and the random thoughts thread, but often I find stuff that is cool and more substantial than the random thoughts, but maybe not quite enough to put in a thread of its own.

I know there's a couple other folks here (Catphish is the one who immediately comes to mind) who finds some very cool articles, etc. as well, so I figured I'd create a thread for linking and sharing that sort of thing. The thread title is a take on the motto for TED talks ("Ideas Worth Spreading"), since I'm sure some TED content will undoubtedly end up here...


I'll start it out by saying articles like this one (on movie stars in Hollywood) are why I love Bill Simmons as a writer. He has some very interesting analysis, but always delivers it in a really accessible and entertaining way.
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Old 07-01-2011, 12:51 AM   #2
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We've got the picture thread and the random thoughts thread, but often I find stuff that is cool and more substantial than the random thoughts, but maybe not quite enough to put in a thread of its own.

I know there's a couple other folks here (Catphish is the one who immediately comes to mind) who finds some very cool articles, etc. as well, so I figured I'd create a thread for linking and sharing that sort of thing. The thread title is a take on the motto for TED talks ("Ideas Worth Spreading"), since I'm sure some TED content will undoubtedly end up here...


I'll start it out by saying articles like this one (on movie stars in Hollywood) are why I love Bill Simmons as a writer. He has some very interesting analysis, but always delivers it in a really accessible and entertaining way.
tl;dr
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Old 07-01-2011, 12:56 AM   #3
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tl;dr
I will stab you in the mouth
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:54 AM   #4
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:55 AM   #5
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Space Ghost C2C was super funny after a dozen or so bong loads, sort of weird when you're sober. This, however, is fucking hilarious. Randy Savage can make anything funny.
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:06 AM   #6
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One of my favorite analysis sites has started an article a day/week where leading researchers answer the question "what would I research with an unlimited budget".

http://theconversation.edu.au/if-i-h...s-of-life-1158
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:08 AM   #7
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Randy Savage can make anything funny.
Except for a heart attack while driving.




Oh wait, I guess that was just funny, but I get the assist!
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:59 AM   #8
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Will the electric car simply replace our dependence on one finite resource with another?
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Old 07-01-2011, 11:20 AM   #9
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I'll start it out by saying articles like this one (on movie stars in Hollywood) are why I love Bill Simmons as a writer. He has some very interesting analysis, but always delivers it in a really accessible and entertaining way.
"Fact: People believe Ryan Reynolds is a movie star (even though he isn't)."

That alone makes this article Now back to reading the rest.
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Old 07-01-2011, 11:20 AM   #10
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One of the talks I enjoyed at TEDx east. The case for manual competence. I talked to the guy at a break, and he was a bit standoffish at first, but warmed up after i mentioned I was a UX designer

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Old 07-01-2011, 01:30 PM   #11
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Video game console design mistakes. Kind of an interesting read, especially some of the older stuff. 5200 analog controllers, I'm glaring at you

http://technologizer.com/2009/08/10/...sign-mistakes
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:51 PM   #12
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That's an idea worth sharing with probably 90% of the public.
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Old 07-01-2011, 02:37 PM   #13
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One of the talks I enjoyed at TEDx east. The case for manual competence. I talked to the guy at a break, and he was a bit standoffish at first, but warmed up after i mentioned I was a UX designer

That was excellent! Nice share Chucky, I enjoyed all 20+ minutes of it
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:54 PM   #14
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I enjoyed this as well. I think I'm among the last generation of people who fixes things myself (I'm 26). I've thought about this a lot, most of my friends don't know how to perform manual labour, no matter how basic the nature of that labour might be.
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Old 07-01-2011, 04:56 PM   #15
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I don't think it's about manual labor. People have lost interest in how things work and how to fix them. All of America has gone Jewish!
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:16 PM   #16
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I don't think it's about manual labor. People have lost interest in how things work and how to fix them. All of America has gone Jewish!
Or they lost interest because they just cant fix them. When I owned my Chevy Chevette (go ahead, laugh) as my first car, I worked on the thing up until i could do no more and it died. It was simple, like repairing a lawnmower, very clear what needed to be done.

My Matrix? Nope, even for a low end car, i would not dare touch the engine were it ever to need work (hasnt yet, knock on wood). Everything is controlled by microprocessors, the parts are expensive, etc. I simply cant do the things I would have done 30 years ago to my car.

I still do plenty of work on my house, tho. Carpentry and other repairs-- they cant take that away from me, dammit.

But I also had shop classes when I was a kid, instead of learning Excel.
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:41 PM   #17
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Or they lost interest because they just cant fix them. When I owned my Chevy Chevette (go ahead, laugh) as my first car, I worked on the thing up until i could do no more and it died. It was simple, like repairing a lawnmower, very clear what needed to be done.

My Matrix? Nope, even for a low end car, i would not dare touch the engine were it ever to need work (hasnt yet, knock on wood). Everything is controlled by microprocessors, the parts are expensive, etc. I simply cant do the things I would have done 30 years ago to my car.
That's a good observation. When I'm home in Detroit I look at my Wrangler like a Science project; I'm constantly tinkering and messing around. There's no way in hell I'm going to do anything but fill washer fluid on my Grand Cherokee.
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Old 07-01-2011, 05:59 PM   #18
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That's a good observation. When I'm home in Detroit I look at my Wrangler like a Science project; I'm constantly tinkering and messing around. There's no way in hell I'm going to do anything but fill washer fluid on my Grand Cherokee.
Funny story-
On my old ladies car I couldn't find the washer well to add washer fluid
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Old 07-01-2011, 06:24 PM   #19
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Or they lost interest because they just cant fix them. When I owned my Chevy Chevette (go ahead, laugh) as my first car, I worked on the thing up until i could do no more and it died. It was simple, like repairing a lawnmower, very clear what needed to be done.

My Matrix? Nope, even for a low end car, i would not dare touch the engine were it ever to need work (hasnt yet, knock on wood). Everything is controlled by microprocessors, the parts are expensive, etc. I simply cant do the things I would have done 30 years ago to my car.

I still do plenty of work on my house, tho. Carpentry and other repairs-- they cant take that away from me, dammit.

But I also had shop classes when I was a kid, instead of learning Excel.
Cars have gotten more advanced, no doubt, but the biggest difference is actually in the diagnosis part of the operation. A brake pad is still a brake pad. A shock absorber is still a shock absorber. Once you remove the engine covers, there's still an engine underneath, apart from a few extra sensors, and the fact that most cars have gone from a carburator /coil / distributor setup to an individual coil / injection system, there aren't really much of a difference. There are more wires, more stuff that can (and will) break, but I actually think that repairs have gotten easier (for the most part). You can go to a shop, get an estimate of what the repairs will cost, and what parts need to be changed, and voilà, you've got the parts you need. If a coil is busted, you remove it, and replace it. Much like changing a spark plug. If an injector dies, you remove it, and install a new one. The car will fire right up, without any problems (as long as you keep yourself grounded to avoid static electricity, which can damage the ECU). No more fiddling around with the carburator, not getting it to run right. Nowadays, electrical parts are mostly plug & play. you simply remove the part, disconnect the plug, and install the new one. You might have to reset the ECU/diagnostic unit to remove error codes, but that's pretty much it.

Granted, there's not a whole lot of wasted space in today's cars, so you have to fiddle around more, and maybe remove some parts in order to get access.

It has to be said that I set up the standalone fuel management system in a car I built five years ago, so there's really not any mystery to it for me, and I can understand how that stuff can seem a little daunting, but really, - it's quite easy, once you know which parts needs replacing.
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Old 07-01-2011, 06:27 PM   #20
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We've got the picture thread and the random thoughts thread, but often I find stuff that is cool and more substantial than the random thoughts, but maybe not quite enough to put in a thread of its own.

I know there's a couple other folks here (Catphish is the one who immediately comes to mind) who finds some very cool articles, etc. as well, so I figured I'd create a thread for linking and sharing that sort of thing. The thread title is a take on the motto for TED talks ("Ideas Worth Spreading"), since I'm sure some TED content will undoubtedly end up here...


I'll start it out by saying articles like this one (on movie stars in Hollywood) are why I love Bill Simmons as a writer. He has some very interesting analysis, but always delivers it in a really accessible and entertaining way.
Great article, I love his stuff
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Old 07-01-2011, 06:34 PM   #21
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Cars have gotten more advanced, no doubt, but the biggest difference is actually in the diagnosis part of the operation. A brake pad is still a brake pad. A shock absorber is still a shock absorber. Once you remove the engine covers, there's still an engine underneath, apart from a few extra sensors, and the fact that most cars have gone from a carburator /coil / distributor setup to an individual coil / injection system, there aren't really much of a difference. There are more wires, more stuff that can (and will) break, but I actually think that repairs have gotten easier (for the most part). You can go to a shop, get an estimate of what the repairs will cost, and what parts need to be changed, and voilà, you've got the parts you need. If a coil is busted, you remove it, and replace it. Much like changing a spark plug. If an injector dies, you remove it, and install a new one. The car will fire right up, without any problems (as long as you keep yourself grounded to avoid static electricity, which can damage the ECU). No more fiddling around with the carburator, not getting it to run right. Nowadays, electrical parts are mostly plug & play. you simply remove the part, disconnect the plug, and install the new one. You might have to reset the ECU/diagnostic unit to remove error codes, but that's pretty much it.

Granted, there's not a whole lot of wasted space in today's cars, so you have to fiddle around more, and maybe remove some parts in order to get access.

It has to be said that I set up the standalone fuel management system in a car I built five years ago, so there's really not any mystery to it for me, and I can understand how that stuff can seem a little daunting, but really, - it's quite easy, once you know which parts needs replacing.
Part of the problem for me with working on newer cars is that, while some of the stuff is actually easier, the stakes are much higher if you make a mistake. That, and I have a vested interest in the job being done right the first time; correct diagnosis of a problem isn't as simple as it once was, so the chances of a repair not correcting a problem are higher. With the cost of parts nowadays (I paid $125 for a single fucking injector on my 1994 Pathfinder), getting it right the first time is important. When I had that fixed, I would have had no idea how to figure out which injector to replace, so it could have taken me hours and cost me a bunch of money to get it right.
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:06 PM   #22
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Part of the problem for me with working on newer cars is that, while some of the stuff is actually easier, the stakes are much higher if you make a mistake. That, and I have a vested interest in the job being done right the first time; correct diagnosis of a problem isn't as simple as it once was, so the chances of a repair not correcting a problem are higher. With the cost of parts nowadays (I paid $125 for a single fucking injector on my 1994 Pathfinder), getting it right the first time is important. When I had that fixed, I would have had no idea how to figure out which injector to replace, so it could have taken me hours and cost me a bunch of money to get it right.
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Oh, I hear ya. Most of the parts used in a car's electrical system are generic Bosch parts that'll run you 3x (easily) the cost if purchased through dealers.

If you know what's broken, fixing it yourself is both easy and cheap, and in reality, you run very little risk of breaking anything expensive, as long as you control the static electricity. Avoiding nylon carpets, touching bare metal with regular intervals is enough to avoid any static discharge. The worst that could happen is that you'll damage the ECU, or accidentally fire off the airbags. Disconnecting the battery and the ECU cable (which might be tricky, depending on the ECU's location) eliminates that problem, though.

The difficulty (as I mentioned in the post you quoted) lies with making the diagnosis. Purchasing an interface cable (which'll run you ~$200 at the most) helps that, though. I did that with my '94 Audi S4 (which was pretty advanced for it's time). Whenever something broke, I hooked up my computer to the OBD port, recorded any error codes that appeared, did a Google search, and purchased the parts I needed on eBay.

I probably wouldn't bother fixing a car myself if it was my only car, though, unless it was an easy fix.
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Old 07-02-2011, 06:56 AM   #23
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I found this an intensely curious article with a lot of interesting ideas.

I can't say I've any affection for vehicles, but the closing of the article, and it's discussion of different materials and the areas they are found in I find quite interesting.

(views the jar of Phosphorus he uses in gardening differently)
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Old 07-02-2011, 07:54 AM   #24
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I can't say I've any affection for vehicles,
None at all? You have my sympathy...
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:00 AM   #25
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One of the talks I enjoyed at TEDx east. The case for manual competence. I talked to the guy at a break, and he was a bit standoffish at first, but warmed up after i mentioned I was a UX designer

I enjoyed that too. But I kind of felt like he was a fraud around the 8 min mark
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Old 07-02-2011, 08:39 AM   #26
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answer to Lithium problem..

http://www.meridian-int-res.com/Proj...r_Solution.pdf


Or we could dump batteries altogether and go with air compression driven cars.
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Old 07-02-2011, 10:48 AM   #27
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Oh, I hear ya. Most of the parts used in a car's electrical system are generic Bosch parts that'll run you 3x (easily) the cost if purchased through dealers.

If you know what's broken, fixing it yourself is both easy and cheap, and in reality, you run very little risk of breaking anything expensive, as long as you control the static electricity. Avoiding nylon carpets, touching bare metal with regular intervals is enough to avoid any static discharge. The worst that could happen is that you'll damage the ECU, or accidentally fire off the airbags. Disconnecting the battery and the ECU cable (which might be tricky, depending on the ECU's location) eliminates that problem, though.

The difficulty (as I mentioned in the post you quoted) lies with making the diagnosis. Purchasing an interface cable (which'll run you ~$200 at the most) helps that, though. I did that with my '94 Audi S4 (which was pretty advanced for it's time). Whenever something broke, I hooked up my computer to the OBD port, recorded any error codes that appeared, did a Google search, and purchased the parts I needed on eBay.

I probably wouldn't bother fixing a car myself if it was my only car, though, unless it was an easy fix.
I did the same thing with my Jetta. Bought the interface cable and diagnositc software for my laptop.Saved me hundreds in repair bills
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Old 07-02-2011, 12:39 PM   #28
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I'm going to want you to sign a NDA and some other forms before I share any ideas. `-`
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Old 07-07-2011, 06:28 PM   #29
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Five floating city concepts. It's pretty cool in concept.

http://weburbanist.com/2011/06/16/th...island-cities
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Old 07-07-2011, 06:34 PM   #30
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Five floating city concepts. It's pretty cool in concept.

http://weburbanist.com/2011/06/16/th...island-cities
Definitely intriguing.
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